Tuesday, February 18, 2020
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Bulletstorm: Kill with Skill, is that Enough?

When you first start up Bulletstorm or if you’ve seen any of the videos you’ll know that People Can Fly and Epic Games weren’t going for the realistic or narrative heavy approach. You’ll see a wide array of people blowing up like blood filled pinatas, hear highly suggestive name calling that you wouldn’t even think to make up yourself and enough skillshots that will always challenge you to think of how to take down your opponents.

What you’ll really notice when you first hop into the game though is the stunning visuals and backdrops that surround you and put you in some of the best environments seen in a video game. That only gets better when you get to destroy them to take down your enemies or control a robot T-Rex that stomps through everything in its path laying destruction in all directions.

The single player campaign brings out the suggestive language but if you have an open mind about it, it’s quite humorous just because it’s so over the top. That’s a high point in Bulletstorm though, it doesn’t take itself too seriously which makes it much more enjoyable. The pacing of the single player campaign is also a great thing. You never get the feeling of being rushed through it and it doesn’t give you the obvious: slow start, peaking climax, rushing end routine. As you go through the campaign you can unlock more weapons with different firing modes that present you with more skillshots available to your arsenal to earn more points for more upgrades. It’s a rewarding system but as the campaign goes on you’ll find yourself doing a lot of skillshots over and over again unless you really sit there and force yourself to do one but the harder skillshots require a lot of precision that may not come easy later on. It’s great there are so many options but you’ll soon feel that you’re going through the motions of; boot, leash, shoot. There is more to the game that really tests your skillshots, however, and that is in the mode called Echo Mode.

Echo Mode is essentially parts of the single player campaign that you can run through to try and get the most points and compete globally or against your friends with. This is a great way to learn skillshots and better yourself within the game and is definitely very challenging for those looking for that extra challenge. If the campaign or Echo Mode isn’t enough there is always the multiplayer Anarchy Mode.

Finally! A multiplayer game that can just be cooperative amongst friends, or others online. Anarchy Mode takes the form of Horde mode in Gears of War 2 or Firefight in Halo Reach where waves of enemies are thrown at you and you and your teammates must work together to dispatch them. Using this formula and adding it with Bulletstorm’s skillshot system makes for a very new and very fresh multiplayer experience. Each wave has a point requirement to move on to the next wave but the enemies are limited so it’s up to your team to pull off team skillshots for higher point values. To get the enjoyment out of the experience it’s entirely up to how you and your team play because obviously if you just run around shooting enemies for ten points at a time there is no way you’re going to move to the next wave. Choose your teammates wisely or if you’re going online, hope that you’ll get some good teammates and communicate efficiently. This will make you happy and satisfied when you check some game leaderboard statistics by FPS tracker because of the good ranking and level.

If you’re looking for something new in the action, shooter genre Bulletstorm is for you. You will definitely find something here that will tickle your fancy. Skillshots and gamemodes like Echo Mode and Anarchy Mode keep the replay value high and keeps Bulletstorm in a separate category of fun aside from those other run of the mill shooters out there on the market.

David
David
David Scott is the head writer at TRI PR. He better part of his college life as a journalist for the college magazine. He still writes and he loves it.